Tag: Stanley Kubrick

Kubrick, Pudovkin’s Film Technique and Eisenstein

Kubrick: I read Eisenstein's books at the time, and to this day I still don't really understand them. The most instructive book on film aesthetics I came across was Pudovkin's Film Technique, which simply explained that editing was the aspect of film art form which was completely unique, and which separated it from all other art forms.

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New Software Can Actually Edit Actors’ Facial Expressions

FaceDirector can seamlessly blend several takes to create nuanced blends of emotions, potentially cutting down on the number of takes necessary in filming.

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Kubrick and his lenses, with Joe Dunton BSC

ARRI IIC and lenses from the LACMA Kubrick exhibit.

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Some of the questions are in French. Click on the arrows in the lower right to make full screen.

Synthesizers in the Movies

Hans Zimmer and his Moog Modular

Composer Neil Brand celebrates the art of cinema music, Neil explores how changing technology has taken soundtracks in bold new directions and even altered our very idea of how a film should sound.

In the last of three programmes in which composer Neil Brand celebrates the art of cinema music, Neil explores how changing technology has taken soundtracks in bold new directions and even altered our very idea of how a film should sound.

Neil tells the story of how the 1956 science fiction film Forbidden Planet ended up with a groundbreaking electronic score that blurred the line between music and sound effects, and explains why Alfred Hitchcock’s the Birds has one of the most effective soundtracks of any of his films – despite having no music. He shows how electronic music crossed over from pop into cinema with Midnight Express and Chariots of Fire, while films like Apocalypse Now pioneered the concept of sound design – that sound effects could be used for storytelling and emotional impact.

Neil tracks down some of the key composers behind these innovations to talk about their work, such as Vangelis (Chariots of Fire, Blade Runner), Carter Burwell (Twilight, No Country for Old Men) and Clint Mansell (Requiem for a Dream, Moon).

Sound of Cinema: The Music that Made the Movies

Roger Ebert Interviews Arthur C. Clarke

Above spaceship Discovery model at the LACMA Kubrick exhibit (app here). The exhibit is traveling the world.

Photo by Steve.

Arthur C. Clarke also wrote about the geosynchronous satellite in the October 1945 issues of Wireless World. That is why the area where geosynchronous satellites orbit the Earth is called the Clarke Belt.

“In March of 1997, film critic Roger Ebert interviewed author Arthur C. Clarke, who wrote “2001: A Space Odyssey.” The interview was featured at “Cyberfest ‘97,” a gala celebration at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.”

I recommend these books and DVDs if you want to learn more about 2001: A Space Odyssey.