Category: People

Walter Becker

Walter Becker
Walter Becker and Donald Fagen of Steely Dan

RIP Walter Becker.

Photos of Walter Becker and Donald Fagen of Steely Dan that I took in Las Vegas, 2016.

 

 

Hitchcock/Truffaut Documentary

In 1962, French New Wave auteur François Truffaut spent a week in Hollywood with his idol, Alfred Hitchcock. discussing films such as Psycho and Vertigo.

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William Friedkin Talks ‘French Connection,’ ‘Sorcerer,’ & ‘The Exorcist’ In This Podcast Interview

The director of “The French Connection,” “The Exorcist,” “Sorcerer,” “Cruising,” “To Live and Die in L.A.,” “Bug,” and “Killer Joe,” to name just a few, William Friedkin is one of the greats to emerge from the 1970s brat pack director’s scene that included Martin Scorsese, Francis Ford Coppola, Peter Bogdanovich, and more.

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Joe Dante Talks About ‘Termite Terrace,’ The Film He Tried To Make About Warner Bros. Animators

Director Joe Dante (Gremlins) talks about the time he developed a film about Golden Age Hollywood animators called Termite Terrace, the unglamorous nickname of the Warner Bros. animation studio in the 1930s.

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Walter Murch at CAMERIMAGE 2015

Interview with Walter Murch who received the Camerimage festival’s Special Award to Editor with Unique Visual Sensitivity. He edited sound on American Graffiti and The Godfather: Part II, won his first Academy Award nomination for The Conversation, won his first Oscar for Apocalypse Now, and won an unprecedented double Oscar for Best Sound and Best Film Editing for his work on The English Patient.

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Akio Morita and the end of Sony Betamax

Akio Morita was a founder, and for many years, the CEO of Sony. He was the Steve Jobs of Japan. During his tenure Sony came up with many consumer electronic advances. Sony first launched its Betamax products in 1975 as a household, magnetic video format for consumers to record analog television shows.

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Veteran ADR Mixer Doc Kane of Walt Disney Studios

What has three letters, many aliases and is of major significance to the sound community? You guessed it: ADR aka Automated Dialog Replacement aka Additional Dialog Recording aka Dubbing aka Looping. All of these monikers are understood as the process of re-recording dialog that cannot be salvaged from a production. To make one thing clear, there is nothing automated about it. ADR is an art.

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Floyd Norman – An Animated Life – Teaser

Photo Credit Mr. Fun’s Journal

Floyd Norman: An Animated Life is a feature-length look the prolific animator and story artist’s life from growing up in Santa Barbara, CA to his years working as an animator at Disney, Hanna-Barbera, Pixar and more. The undisputed “Forrest Gump” of the animation world, Norman was hired as the first African-American at Disney in 1956. He would later be hand-picked by Walt Disney himself to join the story team on the Jungle Book. After Disney’s death, Norman left the studio to start his own company to produce black history films for high schools. He and his partners would later work with Hanna-Barbera, and animate the original Fat Albert Special, as well as the titles to TV mainstay Soul Train.

Norman returned to Disney in the 1980s to work in their Publishing department. And in 1998, he returned to Disney Animation to work in the story department on Mulan. But an invite to the Bay area in the late 90s became a career highlight. Norman was now working with another emerging great: Pixar and Steve Jobs, on Toy Story 2 and Monsters Inc.

Life as an animator is a nomadic one, but Norman spent the majority of his career at Disney, and views it as his “home.” Retired by Disney at age 65 in 2000, the documentary focuses on Norman’s difficulty with a retirement he was not ready for. Not one to quit, Norman chose to occupy an empty cubicle at Disney Publishing for the last 15 years. As he puts it, “[He] just won’t leave.” A term has been coined by Disney employees — “Floydering.” While not on staff, his proximity to other Disney personnel has led him to pick up freelance work, and he continues to have an impact on animation as both an artist and mentor.

Source: Michael Fiore Films

Floyd Norman – An Animated Life – Teaser 1 from Michael Fiore Films on Vimeo.


Find out more about Floyd Norman at his blog.
Floyd Norman’s Blog

More at the links below.

Floyd Norman on His Days as a “Lowly Assistant”

Talking An “Animated Life” with Floyd Norman

Disney Celebrates Animation Legend Floyd Norman’s 80th Birthday

Kubrick and his lenses, with Joe Dunton BSC

ARRI IIC and lenses from the LACMA Kubrick exhibit.

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Some of the questions are in French. Click on the arrows in the lower right to make full screen.

IBM at the 1964 World’s Fair by Charles and Ray Eames

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The entire IBM pavilion was designed by Charles Eames and Eero Saarinen Associates.
Image: Eames Designs

From http://eamesdesigns.com.

The Eames Office curated the entire IBM Pavillion, with many movies and exhibits on the ground floor. The climactic feature was the movie THINK, shown in the egg-shaped structure which towered 90 feet overhead. This movie gives the viewer something of the entire pavilion experience, including THINK.

A multi-screen presentation at the Ovoid Theater of the IBM Pavilion of the New York World’s Fair, Think was projected on 22 separate screens (shaped in circles, squares, triangles, and rectangles), and included a live host. The 22 images were not projected simultaneously, and included live and still motion and animation. The IBM Pavilion, including the Ovoid Theater, was designed by Eames. Think is available in a single screen version titled View From the People Wall: A single screen condensation of the elaborate multi-image show at the IBM Pavilion in New York, aimed at showing that the complex problems of our times are solved in the same way as the simple problems, they are just more complicated. Musical score by Elmer Bernstein.


From IBM:

The husband and wife team of Charles and Ray Eames had an especially strong influence on IBM’s thinking. They were best known at the time for their molded-plastic and plywood chairs. But for IBM, the couple designed everything from the exhibit at the 1964 World’s Fair, to the film Powers of 10, to the famous exhibit Mathematica, to dozens of educational films for school and television that helped teach generations about science, math and technology. As designers, Charles and Ray Eames were problem solvers. They dedicated themselves to making things better, not just different. “They taught that if you don’t understand something, you can’t design it,” says Lee Green, the vice president in charge of IBM’s Brand Experience and Strategic Design. “Design has to be purposeful. It’s not about cosmetics and decoration. It’s about substance.” Or, as Charles Eames put it, “Design is a plan for arranging elements in such a way as best to accomplish a particular purpose.” By that definition, IBM’s researchers could be seen as designers, and its designers have been researchers and teachers.