Category: Technology

Watch: How Andy Warhol’s Lost Computer Art Was Finally Found

Back in the 1980s, computer makers were scrambling to get Andy Warhol to try out their spiffy new graphic software. Among them was Steve Jobs, who had been pestering Warhol to play with MacPaint, initially to a lukewarm response.

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Veteran ADR Mixer Doc Kane of Walt Disney Studios

What has three letters, many aliases and is of major significance to the sound community? You guessed it: ADR aka Automated Dialog Replacement aka Additional Dialog Recording aka Dubbing aka Looping. All of these monikers are understood as the process of re-recording dialog that cannot be salvaged from a production. To make one thing clear, there is nothing automated about it. ADR is an art.

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Glen Keane ‘drawing sculptures’ in virtual reality with Tilt Brush

"I can put goggles on and I just step into the paper and now I'm drawing in it," Keane says. "Today, all the rules have changed."

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“What Lives Inside” Episodes

I previously wrote about What Lives Inside here.

This is the future folks, computer companies producing a movie to be shown on a streaming service.

Get ready to be taken to a world beyond your imagination. From Academy Award Winner Robert Stromberg, Dell presents What Lives Inside. Starring Academy Award Winner J.K. Simmons, Colin Hanks and Catherine O’Hara. Premiering March 25th only on Hulu.

This is the Episode playlist and some behind the scenes.

Here is the Making of video.


Intel Dell What Lives Inside – Behind the Scenes by CGMeetup


Intel Dell What Lives Inside – VFX Breakdown by CGMeetup

Lucasfilm, Industrial Light & Magic and Skywalker Sound Launch ILMxLAB

From SoundWorks Collection

Industrial Light & Magic (ILM) and parent company Lucasfilm, Ltd. announce the formation of ILM Experience Lab (ILMxLAB), a new division that will draw upon the talents of Lucasfilm, ILM and Skywalker Sound. ILMxLAB combines compelling storytelling, technological innovation and world-class production to create immersive entertainment experiences. For several years, the company has been investing in real-time graphics – building a foundation that allows ILMxLAB to deliver interactive imagery at a fidelity never seen before. As this new dimension in storytelling unfolds, ILMxLAB will develop virtual reality, augmented reality, real-time cinema, theme park entertainment and narrative-based experiences for future platforms.

 

Click here for an exclusive interview with Rob Bredlow at FX Guide.

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Development of a Bipedal Robot that Walks Like an Animation Character

From Disney Research.

Authors
Seungmoon Song (Disney Research Pittsburgh)
Joohyung Kim (Disney Research Pittsburgh)
Katsu Yamane (Disney Research Pittsburgh)

IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA) 2015

May 26, 2015

Our goal is to bring animation characters to life in the real world. We present a bipedal robot that looks like and walks like an animation character. We start from animation data of a character walking. We develop a bipedal robot which corresponds to lower part of the character following its kinematic structure. The links are 3D printed and the joints are actuated by servo motors. Using trajectory optimization, we generate an open-loop walking trajectory that mimics the character’s walking motion by modifying the motion such that the Zero Moment Point stays in the contact convex hull. The walking is tested on the developed hardware system.

Download File “Development of a Bipedal Robot that Walks Like an Animation Character-Paper”
[PDF, 1.42 MB]

IBM at the 1964 World’s Fair by Charles and Ray Eames

IBM_3

The entire IBM pavilion was designed by Charles Eames and Eero Saarinen Associates.
Image: Eames Designs

From http://eamesdesigns.com.

The Eames Office curated the entire IBM Pavillion, with many movies and exhibits on the ground floor. The climactic feature was the movie THINK, shown in the egg-shaped structure which towered 90 feet overhead. This movie gives the viewer something of the entire pavilion experience, including THINK.

A multi-screen presentation at the Ovoid Theater of the IBM Pavilion of the New York World’s Fair, Think was projected on 22 separate screens (shaped in circles, squares, triangles, and rectangles), and included a live host. The 22 images were not projected simultaneously, and included live and still motion and animation. The IBM Pavilion, including the Ovoid Theater, was designed by Eames. Think is available in a single screen version titled View From the People Wall: A single screen condensation of the elaborate multi-image show at the IBM Pavilion in New York, aimed at showing that the complex problems of our times are solved in the same way as the simple problems, they are just more complicated. Musical score by Elmer Bernstein.


From IBM:

The husband and wife team of Charles and Ray Eames had an especially strong influence on IBM’s thinking. They were best known at the time for their molded-plastic and plywood chairs. But for IBM, the couple designed everything from the exhibit at the 1964 World’s Fair, to the film Powers of 10, to the famous exhibit Mathematica, to dozens of educational films for school and television that helped teach generations about science, math and technology. As designers, Charles and Ray Eames were problem solvers. They dedicated themselves to making things better, not just different. “They taught that if you don’t understand something, you can’t design it,” says Lee Green, the vice president in charge of IBM’s Brand Experience and Strategic Design. “Design has to be purposeful. It’s not about cosmetics and decoration. It’s about substance.” Or, as Charles Eames put it, “Design is a plan for arranging elements in such a way as best to accomplish a particular purpose.” By that definition, IBM’s researchers could be seen as designers, and its designers have been researchers and teachers.

“What Lives Inside” Official Trailer and behind the scenes

This is the future folks, computer companies producing a movie to be shown on a streaming service.

Get ready to be taken to a world beyond your imagination. From Academy Award Winner Robert Stromberg, Dell presents What Lives Inside. Starring Academy Award Winner J.K. Simmons, Colin Hanks and Catherine O’Hara. Premiering March 25th only on Hulu. Find out more at here.

From Fast Co.Create.

What Lives Inside is the fourth installment of Intel’s “Inside Films” series, dating back to a partnership with Toshiba, and agency Pereira & O’Dell, that started in 2011 with Inside, starring Emmy Rossum and directed by D.J. Caruso. It was followed by 2012’s The Beauty Inside starring Topher Grace, and 2013’s The Power Inside starring Harvey Keitel.

This year’s film, divided into four episodes, is about the son of an absentee father (Hanks) who finds himself on a journey of self-discovery after the death of his father (Simmons), a well-known and acclaimed children’s puppeteer who was widely celebrated for his creativity. The son discovers a mysterious world of his dad’s creation and finds himself on an adventure that will soon unlock his own creativity.

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Pereira & O’Dell chief creative officer PJ Pereira says one of the biggest challenges this year was finding another fresh way of bringing the same premise—Intel tagline “It’s what’s inside that counts”—to life. “We had to find a role to make the product not the subject of the story we are telling, but a character,” says Pereira. “Because characters are what the audience will remember and love months after the campaign is gone.”

In addition to Oscar-winning talent, each Inside Films series featured a social element, soliciting submissions from people for the chance to see their photo and videos for the film, or even audition for a part. This year, it worked a bit differently. “This time, because the central theme is their creativity, that’s what is on display. Their drawings, as if they were all kids that have submitted ideas to the character played by J.K. Simmons,” says Pereira.

Just six weeks after Stromberg issued a challenge online, the film received thousands of creature submissions and more user-generated content than the two previous films combined. “This project always felt more like a film than an ad, with its longer format, incredible cast and extensive visual effects,” says Stromberg, who won art direction Oscars for Alice in Wonderland and Avatar. “The whole interactive angle is also super interesting to me. We’ve had over 6,000 submissions of art work, which is crazy! I just think that’s a much better indicator of engagement than throwing a project into testing. I love how it lets people be an active part of the final product. Any time I can be a part of inspiring others to get in touch with their creative side, only inspires me more as an artist.”

The film debuts on Hulu, with new episodes weekly for four weeks, then starting May 6 the full series will be available on WhatLivesInside.com and YouTube.

Synthesizers in the Movies

Hans Zimmer and his Moog Modular

Composer Neil Brand celebrates the art of cinema music, Neil explores how changing technology has taken soundtracks in bold new directions and even altered our very idea of how a film should sound.

In the last of three programmes in which composer Neil Brand celebrates the art of cinema music, Neil explores how changing technology has taken soundtracks in bold new directions and even altered our very idea of how a film should sound.

Neil tells the story of how the 1956 science fiction film Forbidden Planet ended up with a groundbreaking electronic score that blurred the line between music and sound effects, and explains why Alfred Hitchcock’s the Birds has one of the most effective soundtracks of any of his films – despite having no music. He shows how electronic music crossed over from pop into cinema with Midnight Express and Chariots of Fire, while films like Apocalypse Now pioneered the concept of sound design – that sound effects could be used for storytelling and emotional impact.

Neil tracks down some of the key composers behind these innovations to talk about their work, such as Vangelis (Chariots of Fire, Blade Runner), Carter Burwell (Twilight, No Country for Old Men) and Clint Mansell (Requiem for a Dream, Moon).

Sound of Cinema: The Music that Made the Movies

1970 Rod Serling Ad for Radio Shack (video)

From radioshackcatalogs.com

Radio Shack is closing. For those who were electronics hobbyists, like myself, Radio Shack was the likely introduction to the trends and fads in consumer electronics. AM and FM radio, stereo, turntables, open reel tape recording, cassettes, 8 track, CB radio, satellite tv, video tape, camcorders, phones, and cell phones.

They also sold a computer called the TRS 80, pejoratively called the “Trash 80.” Of course, you could get accessories and discrete components.

The above website has many old catalogs as well as a thorough history. My Dad liked Radio Shack because when he was young, he went to the large store in Boston.