Category: Filmmaking

Kodak and Yves Béhar Revive the Super 8 Camera

The charm of Super 8 film, according to Yves Béhar, has a lot to do with its texture. The new Super 8 includes an LCD screen that lets the user watch his footage while capturing it, rather than after the fact.

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Tarantino on Ultra Panavision

Oscar-winning cinematographer Robert Richardson ASC digs into the technical nitty-gritty of the large-format anamorphic film process that hasn't been used in nearly 50 years.

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Walter Murch at CAMERIMAGE 2015

Interview with Walter Murch who received the Camerimage festival’s Special Award to Editor with Unique Visual Sensitivity. He edited sound on American Graffiti and The Godfather: Part II, won his first Academy Award nomination for The Conversation, won his first Oscar for Apocalypse Now, and won an unprecedented double Oscar for Best Sound and Best Film Editing for his work on The English Patient.

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Christopher Chapman: Oscar winner made “A Place to Stand” for Expo 67

At Expo 67, in Montreal, A Place to Stand was projected in 70 mm on a screen, using nine synchronized projectors – the beginning of Imax technology.

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Lytro Immerge for VR

Lytro Immerge seems to be the world's first commercial professional Lightfield solution for cinematic VR, which will capture 'video' from many points of view at once and thereby provide a more lifelike presence for live action VR through six degrees of freedom.

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“What Lives Inside” Episodes

I previously wrote about What Lives Inside here.

This is the future folks, computer companies producing a movie to be shown on a streaming service.

Get ready to be taken to a world beyond your imagination. From Academy Award Winner Robert Stromberg, Dell presents What Lives Inside. Starring Academy Award Winner J.K. Simmons, Colin Hanks and Catherine O’Hara. Premiering March 25th only on Hulu.

This is the Episode playlist and some behind the scenes.

Here is the Making of video.


Intel Dell What Lives Inside – Behind the Scenes by CGMeetup


Intel Dell What Lives Inside – VFX Breakdown by CGMeetup

Kubrick and his lenses, with Joe Dunton BSC

ARRI IIC and lenses from the LACMA Kubrick exhibit.

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Some of the questions are in French. Click on the arrows in the lower right to make full screen.

IBM at the 1964 World’s Fair by Charles and Ray Eames

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The entire IBM pavilion was designed by Charles Eames and Eero Saarinen Associates.
Image: Eames Designs

From http://eamesdesigns.com.

The Eames Office curated the entire IBM Pavillion, with many movies and exhibits on the ground floor. The climactic feature was the movie THINK, shown in the egg-shaped structure which towered 90 feet overhead. This movie gives the viewer something of the entire pavilion experience, including THINK.

A multi-screen presentation at the Ovoid Theater of the IBM Pavilion of the New York World’s Fair, Think was projected on 22 separate screens (shaped in circles, squares, triangles, and rectangles), and included a live host. The 22 images were not projected simultaneously, and included live and still motion and animation. The IBM Pavilion, including the Ovoid Theater, was designed by Eames. Think is available in a single screen version titled View From the People Wall: A single screen condensation of the elaborate multi-image show at the IBM Pavilion in New York, aimed at showing that the complex problems of our times are solved in the same way as the simple problems, they are just more complicated. Musical score by Elmer Bernstein.


From IBM:

The husband and wife team of Charles and Ray Eames had an especially strong influence on IBM’s thinking. They were best known at the time for their molded-plastic and plywood chairs. But for IBM, the couple designed everything from the exhibit at the 1964 World’s Fair, to the film Powers of 10, to the famous exhibit Mathematica, to dozens of educational films for school and television that helped teach generations about science, math and technology. As designers, Charles and Ray Eames were problem solvers. They dedicated themselves to making things better, not just different. “They taught that if you don’t understand something, you can’t design it,” says Lee Green, the vice president in charge of IBM’s Brand Experience and Strategic Design. “Design has to be purposeful. It’s not about cosmetics and decoration. It’s about substance.” Or, as Charles Eames put it, “Design is a plan for arranging elements in such a way as best to accomplish a particular purpose.” By that definition, IBM’s researchers could be seen as designers, and its designers have been researchers and teachers.

“What Lives Inside” Official Trailer and behind the scenes

This is the future folks, computer companies producing a movie to be shown on a streaming service.

Get ready to be taken to a world beyond your imagination. From Academy Award Winner Robert Stromberg, Dell presents What Lives Inside. Starring Academy Award Winner J.K. Simmons, Colin Hanks and Catherine O’Hara. Premiering March 25th only on Hulu. Find out more at here.

From Fast Co.Create.

What Lives Inside is the fourth installment of Intel’s “Inside Films” series, dating back to a partnership with Toshiba, and agency Pereira & O’Dell, that started in 2011 with Inside, starring Emmy Rossum and directed by D.J. Caruso. It was followed by 2012’s The Beauty Inside starring Topher Grace, and 2013’s The Power Inside starring Harvey Keitel.

This year’s film, divided into four episodes, is about the son of an absentee father (Hanks) who finds himself on a journey of self-discovery after the death of his father (Simmons), a well-known and acclaimed children’s puppeteer who was widely celebrated for his creativity. The son discovers a mysterious world of his dad’s creation and finds himself on an adventure that will soon unlock his own creativity.

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Pereira & O’Dell chief creative officer PJ Pereira says one of the biggest challenges this year was finding another fresh way of bringing the same premise—Intel tagline “It’s what’s inside that counts”—to life. “We had to find a role to make the product not the subject of the story we are telling, but a character,” says Pereira. “Because characters are what the audience will remember and love months after the campaign is gone.”

In addition to Oscar-winning talent, each Inside Films series featured a social element, soliciting submissions from people for the chance to see their photo and videos for the film, or even audition for a part. This year, it worked a bit differently. “This time, because the central theme is their creativity, that’s what is on display. Their drawings, as if they were all kids that have submitted ideas to the character played by J.K. Simmons,” says Pereira.

Just six weeks after Stromberg issued a challenge online, the film received thousands of creature submissions and more user-generated content than the two previous films combined. “This project always felt more like a film than an ad, with its longer format, incredible cast and extensive visual effects,” says Stromberg, who won art direction Oscars for Alice in Wonderland and Avatar. “The whole interactive angle is also super interesting to me. We’ve had over 6,000 submissions of art work, which is crazy! I just think that’s a much better indicator of engagement than throwing a project into testing. I love how it lets people be an active part of the final product. Any time I can be a part of inspiring others to get in touch with their creative side, only inspires me more as an artist.”

The film debuts on Hulu, with new episodes weekly for four weeks, then starting May 6 the full series will be available on WhatLivesInside.com and YouTube.

IN GLORIOUS TECHNICOLOR

Founded in 1915, the Technicolor Motion Picture Corporation transformed cinema forever with its revolutionary color processes. George Eastman House marks this important centennial with the exhibition In Glorious Technicolor, on view January 24 through April 26, 2015 in the special exhibition galleries.

The exhibition celebrates Technicolor’s vivid history, from the company’s early years through the making of such classics of the Hollywood studio era as The Wizard of Oz (1939), Gone With the Wind (1939), and Singin’ in the Rain (1952). Technicolor’s wide-ranging impact on the form and content of cinema is explored through original artifacts from the Technicolor Corporate Archive, projected video clips, and a range of stunning visual displays.

Highlights include the company’s evolving camera technology, from its early two-color camera from the 1920s to the massive Technirama widescreen system of the 1950s. Original costumes, production designs, posters, and photographs document how color was used creatively and presented to the public, while the vibrant dyes used to create Technicolor’s incomparable “look” shed light on the science behind the process. Rare tests from Douglas Fairbanks’s The Black Pirate (1926), behind-the-scenes stills from the Errol Flynn’s The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938), and home movies from the set of The African Queen (1951) reveal the stars and filmmakers most associated with color. Additionally, the exhibition honors the achievements of Academy Award–winning cinematographers Ray Rennahan and Jack Cardiff, as well as Technicolor’s often overlooked engineers, whose work remained largely out of the limelight.

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To complement the gallery exhibition, the Dryden Theatre is presenting a four-month series of Technicolor films, including some original Technicolor prints.