Category: Filmmaking

New Software Can Actually Edit Actors’ Facial Expressions

FaceDirector can seamlessly blend several takes to create nuanced blends of emotions, potentially cutting down on the number of takes necessary in filming.

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Dali-Disney exhibition uses Virtual Reality

Visitors to a new exhibition at The Dali Museum won’t just be looking at art. They’ll be exploring a Dali painting in a three-dimensional world that turns art into an immersive experience.

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Kodak and Yves Béhar Revive the Super 8 Camera

The charm of Super 8 film, according to Yves Béhar, has a lot to do with its texture. The new Super 8 includes an LCD screen that lets the user watch his footage while capturing it, rather than after the fact.

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Tarantino on Ultra Panavision

Oscar-winning cinematographer Robert Richardson ASC digs into the technical nitty-gritty of the large-format anamorphic film process that hasn't been used in nearly 50 years.

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Walter Murch at CAMERIMAGE 2015

Interview with Walter Murch who received the Camerimage festival’s Special Award to Editor with Unique Visual Sensitivity. He edited sound on American Graffiti and The Godfather: Part II, won his first Academy Award nomination for The Conversation, won his first Oscar for Apocalypse Now, and won an unprecedented double Oscar for Best Sound and Best Film Editing for his work on The English Patient.

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Christopher Chapman: Oscar winner made “A Place to Stand” for Expo 67

At Expo 67, in Montreal, A Place to Stand was projected in 70 mm on a screen, using nine synchronized projectors – the beginning of Imax technology.

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Lytro Immerge for VR

Lytro Immerge seems to be the world's first commercial professional Lightfield solution for cinematic VR, which will capture 'video' from many points of view at once and thereby provide a more lifelike presence for live action VR through six degrees of freedom.

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“What Lives Inside” Episodes

I previously wrote about What Lives Inside here.

This is the future folks, computer companies producing a movie to be shown on a streaming service.

Get ready to be taken to a world beyond your imagination. From Academy Award Winner Robert Stromberg, Dell presents What Lives Inside. Starring Academy Award Winner J.K. Simmons, Colin Hanks and Catherine O’Hara. Premiering March 25th only on Hulu.

This is the Episode playlist and some behind the scenes.

Here is the Making of video.


Intel Dell What Lives Inside – Behind the Scenes by CGMeetup


Intel Dell What Lives Inside – VFX Breakdown by CGMeetup

Kubrick and his lenses, with Joe Dunton BSC

ARRI IIC and lenses from the LACMA Kubrick exhibit.

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Some of the questions are in French. Click on the arrows in the lower right to make full screen.

IBM at the 1964 World’s Fair by Charles and Ray Eames

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The entire IBM pavilion was designed by Charles Eames and Eero Saarinen Associates.
Image: Eames Designs

From http://eamesdesigns.com.

The Eames Office curated the entire IBM Pavillion, with many movies and exhibits on the ground floor. The climactic feature was the movie THINK, shown in the egg-shaped structure which towered 90 feet overhead. This movie gives the viewer something of the entire pavilion experience, including THINK.

A multi-screen presentation at the Ovoid Theater of the IBM Pavilion of the New York World’s Fair, Think was projected on 22 separate screens (shaped in circles, squares, triangles, and rectangles), and included a live host. The 22 images were not projected simultaneously, and included live and still motion and animation. The IBM Pavilion, including the Ovoid Theater, was designed by Eames. Think is available in a single screen version titled View From the People Wall: A single screen condensation of the elaborate multi-image show at the IBM Pavilion in New York, aimed at showing that the complex problems of our times are solved in the same way as the simple problems, they are just more complicated. Musical score by Elmer Bernstein.


From IBM:

The husband and wife team of Charles and Ray Eames had an especially strong influence on IBM’s thinking. They were best known at the time for their molded-plastic and plywood chairs. But for IBM, the couple designed everything from the exhibit at the 1964 World’s Fair, to the film Powers of 10, to the famous exhibit Mathematica, to dozens of educational films for school and television that helped teach generations about science, math and technology. As designers, Charles and Ray Eames were problem solvers. They dedicated themselves to making things better, not just different. “They taught that if you don’t understand something, you can’t design it,” says Lee Green, the vice president in charge of IBM’s Brand Experience and Strategic Design. “Design has to be purposeful. It’s not about cosmetics and decoration. It’s about substance.” Or, as Charles Eames put it, “Design is a plan for arranging elements in such a way as best to accomplish a particular purpose.” By that definition, IBM’s researchers could be seen as designers, and its designers have been researchers and teachers.